Gustav Holst

Gustav Holst Sheet Music

  • Born
    21st September 1874
  • Died
    25th May 1934
  • Birthplace
    cheltenham, Gloucestershire, England

Gustav Theodore Holst (born Gustavus Theodore von Holst, 21 September 1874 – 25 May 1934) was an English composer. He is most famous for his orchestral suite The Planets. His early works show the influence of Grieg, Wagner, Richard Strauss and fellow student Ralph Vaughan Williams, and later, through Vaughan Williams, the music of Ravel. The combined influence of Ravel, Hindu spiritualism and English folk tunes enabled Holst to free himself of the influence of Wagner and Strauss and to forge his own style. Holst's music is well known for unconventional use of metre and haunting melodies. Holst composed almost 200 works, including operas, ballets, choral hymns and songs. An enthusiastic educator, Holst became music master at St Paul's Girls' School in 1905 and director of music at Morley College in 1907, continuing in both posts until retirement.

Title Form Instrument
King Estmere, Op.17 Ballade Choir and Orchestra
Fugal Concerto Concerto Solo Instrument(s) and Orchestra
Sāvitri, Op.25 Opera / Operetta Choir and Orchestra
The Perfect Fool, Op.39 Opera / Operetta Choir and Orchestra
Lyric Movement Piece Solo Instrument(s) and Orchestra
The Twelve Days of Christmas Piece Choir
A Somerset Rhapsody, Op.21 Rhapsody Orchestra
Short Festival Te Deum Sacred Mass Choir and Orchestra
In the Bleak Midwinter Song Choir and Instrument
Lullay My Liking Song Choir
2 Songs without Words, Op.22 Song Cycle Orchestra
4 Songs for Voice and Violin, Op.35 Song Cycle Voice(s) and Instruments
6 Choral Folksongs, Op. 36 Song Cycle Choir
12 Humbert Wolfe Songs, Op.48 Song Cycle Voice(s) and Piano
Choral Hymns from the Rig Veda, Op. 26 Song Cycle Choir and Instrument
Hymns from the Rig Veda, Op.24 Song Cycle Voice(s) and Piano
Songs from 'The Princess', Op.20a Song Cycle Choir
A Moorside Suite Suite Wind Ensemble
Brook Green Suite Suite String Orchestra
First Suite for Military Band, Op. 28 no. 1, Suite Wind Ensemble