MajD-Score.png

The scale of D major has two sharps (F# and C#), and it is frequently used for guitar music. It is well suited to strings instruments in general, given that almost all of them are tuned with their open strings in pitches corresponding to the notes of the scale. This favors sympathetic resonance and makes for a brighter sound. In guitar music, it is common to drop the low E string to D: this eases some fingerings, and it creates the possibility of playing D chords with a powerful, resounding fifth between the lower strings of the instruments. It is also common to lower the G string to an F#. A significant number of string-based pieces has been written in the key of D, such as Mozart's second violin concerto, or Beethoven's violin concerto.

The relative minor of D major is B minor, and its parallel minor key is D minor. The notes that make up the D major scale are the same ones used for the E doric mode, F# phrygian, G lydian, A mixolydian, B aeolian (or minor), and C# locrian.

Below you will find the seven shapes that you can use to play the D major scale on your guitar. You will also find a table of chords you can use with the D major, toghether with their harmonic function.



D major
Pattern I

      MajD-Shape1.jpg   





D major
Pattern II

      MajD-Shape2.jpg   





D major
Pattern III

      MajD-Shape3.jpg  





D major
Pattern IV

      MajD-Shape4.jpg   





D major
Pattern V

       MajD-Shape5.jpg   





D major
Pattern VI

      MajD-Shape6.jpg    





D major
Pattern VII

     MajD-Shape7.jpg



The following chords can be played when using the D major scale.

I
    D 
I7
    D7
 
ii
    Em
II7
    E7
ii7b5
    Em7b5 
iii
    F#m
III7
    F#7 
bIII
    F 
IV
    G 
ii7b5/iii
    G#m7b5
iv
    Gm
V
    A
V7
    A7
v
    Am
vi
    Bm
VI7
    B7 
bVI
    Bb 
vii
    C#dim
vii7b5 
    C#m7b5 
bVII
    C