Théodore Salomé

Théodore Salomé

  • Born
    20th January 1834
  • Died
    26th July 1896
  • Birthplace
Théodore-César Salomé was a French organist and composer. He completed his studies at the Conservatoire de Paris, under Bazin and Benoist, and went on to win several honorable awards. He held a high reputation as an organist, to the point of being recommended by Saint-Saens as his own replacement. Bizet and other composers also spoke highly of him. Even though Salomé acted as a jury in exams at the Conservatoire, his church work always came first for him, to the point of dismissing several fragments of orchestral compositions found to be really interesting by specialists analyzing them in later years. His piano pieces, bearing evocative names, were included in the Pantheon of Pianists published by Henry Lamoine at the beggining of the 20th century. He married Celeste Condrot in 1875 and moved in with her at his new home, just a block away from the Trinity church. Fifteen years later they had a son, named René, who never married. It appears that they were a close family, particularly devoted to Virginie-Marie Condrot. In 1885, Salomé composed his Offertoire pour grand orgue, which gained immense popularity in America, even becoming one of the most popular rolls that was available in Estey Pipe Organ Roll Collection. Salomé himself transcribed it for orchestra under the title Sérénade.

Instruments